“Take Your Broken Heart, Make It Into Art”

“Take Your Broken Heart, Make It Into Art”

Art. Storytelling. Humanity explored. I look to the award shows each new year for an overview of the latest highly-regarded films, television and mini series. I eagerly await a peak at clips and make notes accordingly. Rarely disappointed, I most welcome films and stories that broaden my understanding of the human experience. Any added perspective or inspiration from acceptance speeches is icing on the cake. During tonight’s Golden Globes Meryl Streep held me spellbound with her plea, which went beyond the arts. Beyond Art to Truth Meryl Streep called for…

Human Nature Boils Down to This: We Want to Belong

Human Nature Boils Down to This: We Want to Belong

Human nature — and the human ability to surprise through actions, words and deeds — never cease to amaze. Sometimes the results delight; other times not so much. We see both results amplified in today’s political climate. The increasingly polarized nature of society is troubling. Makes one wonder about civilization and what led us to the current state of affairs. The fullness of this topic is far too complex to tease apart in one blog post. I’ll focus instead on a more basic aspect of human nature: our fundamental desire…

Trapped in a Dream Cul-de-Sac? ‘The Next Happy’ Provides Path Forward

Trapped in a Dream Cul-de-Sac? ‘The Next Happy’ Provides Path Forward

We all nurture dreams. Some we fulfill — Happy Days! Others imprison us. A new book, The Next Happy: Let Go of the Life You Planned and Find a New Way Forward by Tracey Cleantis gives us the framework to recognize when a dream has morphed into its own special nightmare. Conversational and engaging, Tracey grounds us in the challenge of finding our ‘next happy’ by drawing from her own unsuccessful pregnancy pursuit. (Longtime Silent Sorority blog readers will recall her honest and heartfelt story and contributions to the blogging…

Playing Against Type

Playing Against Type

Have you noticed the way infertile women are routinely portrayed as one-dimensional, downright pitiful creatures in TV and film? It doesn’t matter what era the story takes place in. Swap out the costumes and look beyond the hair and makeup and the character is always the same distraught, hapless woman. Take a recent episode of Boardwalk Empire — a series set in the 1920s. It included a cameo appearance of Agent Nelson’s wife begging for a operation that might help her get pregnant (can you imagine the quality of fertility…